Courses for Spring 2020

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Location: Geer Village
Times: Monday, 10am-noon
Dates: Apr 13 - May 11
Sessions: 5

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Post Industrial Northwest Connecti


Did you know northwest Connecticut is a post industrial area ? For nearly 200 years this area hosted a number of industries making products from mousetraps to heavy ship forgings and cannons. This course reviews that history in five sessions covering the towns of Norfolk, Canaan, Salisbury and Sharon.


Instructor: Richard Paddock
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Location: Zoom
Times: Monday, 10am-noon
Dates: Sep 15 - Oct 30
Sessions: 6

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The future ain’t what it used to be


Autumn: 1950’s Bronx, New York.

(“Yogi”) Berra, a Navy combat veteran is playing catcher for the New York Yankees. It’s a sure thing for a team that is getting ready for yet another world series championship. Yogi’s many humorous quotes will make him the most beloved of all our baseball greats. Not only are the Yankees invincible but so is our nation; the world’s only superpower respected and admired by all.

Autumn: 2020 Northwest Corner, CT.

Likely that Covid-19 infections and deaths will resume growth, cannot be. We have watched the reopening and “liberation” of the economy. Enough non compliance with scientific evidence to make us nervous. The protest and riot events of late May show a nation dividend and under social and economic stress

We will review what has happened to our society, economy and institutions from January through September. Can we be confident of anything if we can’t even hug our grandkids? Can our grandkids trust anything if they don’t even know if their schools will be open for classes? We can continue to hope for a magic cure… a drug or vaccine that can quickly bring life back to what it once was. Maybe, but in war hope is not a strategy.

There will be lots of opportunities for questions and discussions during the classes and a special class forum for you to participate in between classes.
The tough part will come at the end winter and elections coming. It will be up to us formulate our views as to what 2021-24 will bring. But no one is an expert about what hasn’t happened yet.

In the meantime, stay well and be sure to follow your President’s advice for a healthy diet. No more cream and sugar in your coffee; try a little Clorox instead. WARNING: Consult your doctor before giving up on the cream and sugar.


Instructor: Jerry Jamin
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Location: Geer Village
Times: Monday, 1-3pm
Dates: Apr 13 - May 4
Sessions: 4

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Opera on Stage and on the Big Screen


This course will be coordinated with the Metropolitan Opera HD broadcasts of the 2019-2020 season as shown at the Moviehouse in Millerton and the Mahaiwe in Great Barrington. Since health issues forced the Fall 2019 class to stop after the first four sessions the Spring 2020 class will begin with Porgy and Bess, followed by Handel’s Agrippina, Puccini’s Tosca, and Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda. We will examine the sources of the librettos: for example, Porgy and Bess began as a novel by DuBose Heyward which was then adapted for the Broadway stage by Dorothy Heyward as a play called Porgy. When George Gershwin was commissioned by the Theatre Guild to write an opera he chose Porgy and worked with his brother Ira (lyrics) and Dubose Heyward (libretto).
We will also review the production history. Again, looking at Porgy and Bess, the Metropolitan Opera considered producing it but it opened in 1935 on Broadway at the Alvin Theater (now the Neil Simon Theater) after a tryout in Boston, where it received mixed reviews and a disappointing run of 124 performances. Since then it has gone through many versions: with spoken dialogue rather than sung recitative, with major musical cuts, and performances in many languages throughout the world


Instructor: Thomas Gruenewald
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Location: Noble Horizons
Times: Tuesday, 10am-noon
Dates: Apr 14 - May 5
Sessions: 4

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Marginalized Americans: the LBGTQ’s


A remarkable change in public opinion in the United States toward to LBGTQ community has taken place since the Stonewall Inn uprising of 1969. This community, once so marginalized that it was forced to become invisible, has done much more than come out of the closet. It has won crucial cases in the Supreme Court and legislation in twenty-two states prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. Federal legislation of a similar nature is pending. This course will examine the awakening of the LBGTQ community, especially from the Stonewall uprising on.

Instructor: Laurance Rand
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Location: Noble Horizons
Times: Tuesday, 1-3pm
Dates: Apr 14 - May 26
Sessions: 7

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Shakespeare


We'll read and discuss Henry IV Parts 1 and 2, and Henry V, the most celebrated of Shakespeare's English history plays. The plays trace the trail of the father and son from Henry IV's successful deposition of Richard II and the founding of his own ruling line to the expedition to France and the glorious victory at Agincourt of his son, Henry V, the “star of England.” But the two kings are in competition for the audience's attention and sympathy with Sir John Falstaff, a knight conspicuously lacking in royal qualities. Falstaff's exuberance and lustful striving after whatever experiences life offers suck the air out of the description of the political machinations of both his sovereigns, to such an extent that what was originally conceived by Shakespeare as a subplot has become for many theatergoers the main plot of the plays, with the political trajectories of the two Henrys functioning as a subplot. We'll investigate why this is so and if we agree with this scholarly upending of the roles.

Instructor: Robert Rumsey
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Location: Noble Horizons
Times: Wednesday, 10am-noon
Dates: Apr 15 - Jun 3
Sessions: 8

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Monsters in 19th Century British Literature:


In this course, we will explore the figure of the monster and conceptions about monstrosity in nineteenth-century British literature. Across a century that experienced unprecedented advances in science and industry, the expansion of the British Empire and global travel, and changes in the agrarian and urban landscape, monsters figure centrally in the cultural and literary imagination. Our readings will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818 edition), Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky,” and Bram Stoker’s Dracula as we try to understand figures that are grotesque, frightful, demonic, mysterious, and seductive. Among the questions we will grapple with are: What forms do these monsters take? What spaces do they inhabit? What reactions do they elicit? What are their origins? How do we recognize them as “monsters?” What are the social, political, and economic contexts in which these stories unfold? A reading schedule will be shared with course participants by mid-March, and supplementary handouts will be provided in class and electronically.

Instructor: Linda Neiberg
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Location: Geer Village
Times: Wednesday, 1-3pm
Dates: Apr 15 - May 27
Sessions: 7

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Doctrine, Dictators, and the Devil


Hitler, Stalin and Mao, among a few notable others, are responsible for the genocide, murder, starvation, and political extermination of many millions of individuals in the twentieth century, collectively setting records for brutality, destruction, slaughter and evil in the whole history of humankind. Why did they do it? Why were they tolerated as long as they were? What can be done to prevent a recurrence? The only answer maybe our understanding of their kind and a willingness to stop them before they become “unstoppable”. This course will feature selections from The Great Courses Programs over seven sessions.

Instructor: Bruce Montgomerie
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Location: Geer Village
Times: Thursday, 1-3pm
Dates: Apr 9 - May 14
Sessions: 6

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A Poetry Seminar


In this six-week program, we will use two books by Edward Hirsch to begin discussions of poetry from all over the globe, from various poets, and from disparate philosophies. This is more of a discussion group than an academic lecture. Please join us in coming to further appreciate poetry and these poets with their remarkable views on our life on earth. We will use Poet’s Choice and How to Read a Poem and Fall In Love With Poetry. Both are by Edward Hirsch. I will supply additional poems and will welcome poems suggested by members of the group.

Instructor: Maura Wolf
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Location: Zoom Meeting
Times: Friday, 10am-noon
Dates: Jun 6 - Jun 20
Sessions: 3

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Zoom Instructor Meeting


TLC Instructor Meeting

Zoom Link below

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82206645620?pwd=THFUUEZ6aDhiNGFwN1NTYVlHb1VjQT09

Meeting ID: 822 0664 5620
Password: 550651


For the Board Meeting on June 16 at 10am


https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84912742104?pwd=RGUxNlozRFdGWmNuKzJqYU9DSWIzQT09

Meeting ID: 849 1274 2104
Password: 233840

Instructor: Harding Bancroft
Location: Noble Horizons
Times: Friday, 1-3pm
Dates: Apr 17 - Jun 5
Sessions: 8

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Playreading


In 1956, a new school of British playwrights appeared who expressly declared their opposition to the reigning offerings of British popular theater. The previous hits were called “well-made plays” as a tribute to the very visible skill that went into their creation. They dealt chiefly with upper-middle and upper class themes, reflected the behavioral norms of their subjects, repressed excessive displays of personal emotion, and were largely innocent of ideological charge. In contrast, the new playwrights were usually of working or lower middle class backgrounds and referred to upper class themes tangentially if at all. The authors preferred the appearance of spontaneity to that of self-conscious craft, brought raw and unfiltered emotion to the foreground and gave more than a hint of Continental imports such as existentialism. They wanted their plays to disturb, not to entertain. Their success pointed the way to the 1960's celebration of instinct and emotion and its corresponding devaluation of exclusively rational means of enthralling an audience. After an initial period of rejection, theatergoers accepted these new plays with as much enthusiasm as they had patronized their predecessors. The former practitioners of the well-made play were stunningly dethroned and were not resuscitated for decades. We'll try to trace what there was about these new plays that toppled one popular school of dramatists and established another with such utterly different content and treatment. We'll read and discuss Look Back in Anger, the play by John Osborne that started the new wave; The Entertainer, also by Osborne; A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney; and What the Butler Saw by Joe Orton. Fridays 1-3 at Noble, 8 classes

Instructor: Robert Rumsey
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